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Aren’t we all CoverJunkies: Loupe Magazine feat. Juan Brenner

Coverjunkies

Photographer and independent art director, lives and works in Guatemala City.

Between 1998 and 2008 works in New York as a fashion photographer, his images have been published in international magazines such as Nylon, People, Oyster, L’Uomo Vogue and Anthem among others.

He is a founding member of Proyectos Ultravioleta. In the middle of 2017 his project MACÚ (in collaboration with Byron Marmol) is curated in the book CLAP, 15 years of the best books of Latin American photography published by 10X10 Books in New York. His work is part of collections in Belgium, Japan, Australia, Italy, the United States, Colombia and Sweden, and his photographic publications (MACÚ 1, MACÚ 2 and Tetano) are part of the permanent library of the MOMA and the TATE collection.

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#newwork • Chimaltenango, Guatemala; 2018 • Tonatiuh rapidly began to demand gold in tribute from the Kaqchikels, souring the friendship between the two peoples. He demanded that the Kaqchikel kings deliver 1000 gold leaves each of 15 pesos. A Kaqchikel priest foretold that the Kaqchikel gods would destroy the Spanish and the Kaqchikel people abandoned their city and fled to the forests and hills on 28 August 1524 (7 Ahmak in the Kaqchikel calendar). Ten days later the Spanish declared war on the Kaqchikel. • This is an image from the project I’ve been working on for the past 18 months, what will become my first book, hopefully published in May this year. A series of photographs that analyze the repercussions of how this land (Guatemala) was conquered and colonized; also the inevitable scars of almost 500 years of disadvantage and unfair conditions, the Guatemalan highlands and their immense beauty are the perfect stage for my research and a series of trips searching for situations that create a personal connection with the neglected reality of our society. I will post more images and more news on how the book evolves, stay tuned. • #juanbrenner #photobook #tonatiuh

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#newwork • Chimaltenango, Guatemala; 2018 • “Arriving at this town, I found all the roads open and very wide, but the roads that ran to the principal streets were obstructed, and then I understood their evil intentions and that everything was arranged to fight us. And seeing that by fire and sword I might bring this people to the service of His Majesty, I determined to burn the chiefs.” ———— Pedro de Alvarado on his first letter to Hernan Cortes, 1524 • This is an image from the project I’ve been working on for the past 18 months, what will become my first book, hopefully published in May this year. A series of photographs that analyze the repercussions of how this land (Guatemala) was conquered and colonized; also the inevitable scars of almost 500 years of disadvantage and unfair conditions, the Guatemalan highlands and their immense beauty are the perfect stage for my research and a series of trips searching for situations that create a personal connection with the neglected reality of our society. I will post more images and more news on how the book evolves, stay tuned. • #juanbrenner #photobook #tonatiuh

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#newwork • San Andrés Itzapa, Chimaltenango, Guatemala; 2018 • Among the many tools used in the Spanish Conquest, Christianity was perhaps the surest way to ensure compliance from the Indigenous population in the New World. After years of using force the Catholic monks and friars had to come to the realization that Christianity as a monotheistic religion was just not something that the Indigenous population embraced. Even when pagan idols where removed and former temples and shrines destroyed, the sites still remained. Christian gods and deities such as saints and virgins were accepted by the conquered, but they continued to worship their own gods in secrecy. This was because the inhabitants of the new world were accustomed to accepting the gods of their conquerors into their pantheon, but they weren't so willing to cease the worship of the gods of their ancestors. • This is an image from the project I’ve been working on for the past 18 months, what will become my first book, hopefully published in May this year. A series of photographs that analyze the repercussions of how this land (Guatemala) was conquered and colonized; also the inevitable scars of almost 500 years of disadvantage and unfair conditions, the Guatemalan highlands and their immense beauty are the perfect stage for my research and a series of trips searching for situations that create a personal connection with the neglected reality of our society. I will post more images and more news on how the book evolves, stay tuned. • #juanbrenner #photobook #tonatiuh

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#newwork • Olintepeque, Quetzaltenango, Guatemala; 2018 • This is the only depiction of “Don Pedro de Alvarado” in my project, the costume is used by the main character of “The Dance of the Conquest”, an allegorical piece created by priests in the mid 1500s in order to teach the non-Spanish speaking natives about religion, battles and the importance of “Tonatiuh”, to this day this dance is performed during celebrations and on sacred calendar dates all around the country. • This is an image from the project I’ve been working on for the past 18 months, what will become my first book, hopefully published in May this year. A series of photographs that analyze the repercussions of how this land (Guatemala) was conquered and colonized; also the inevitable scars of almost 500 years of disadvantage and unfair conditions, the Guatemalan highlands and their immense beauty are the perfect stage for my research and a series of trips searching for situations that create a personal connection with the neglected reality of our society. I will post more images and more news on how the book evolves, stay tuned. • #juanbrenner #photobook #tonatiuh

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1 min
Words by
Staff
Published on
14 May 2019
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